The Pretend Chef

How to make Pure Tigernut flour

Pure Tigernut flour

Pure Tigernut flour is flour produced from the tuber of the tiger nut plant. It is gluten-free, nut-free, seed-free and grain-free. It suits many types of diet like Paleo, Keto, diabetic, raw food and is particularly important to the vegan diet. Read to know 25 amazing facts about tigernut flour.

Tigernut flour can be made in two ways, by drying off the pulp leftover from making tiger nut milk (kunnu aya, horchata de chufas), Tiger nut Pulp flour and by grinding into powder the dry tigernut tuber giving you Pure tigernut flour. Both ways are good though the flours produced have a few differences which have to be put into consideration when using either.

The Pure tigernut flour is mostly store bought. Flour made this way has all of its nutrients still intact including the carbohydrate (3 g of net carbs per tablespoon of flour). The carbs make it suitable only in small quantity for diets like the keto diet. It is a high fibre flour, the texture is light but denser and sweeter than the tigernut pulp flour. There are different grades of Pure tigernut flour depending on its degree of fineness.

Dry tigernut used for Pure Tigernut flour

Dry Tiger nuts

There are two ways to make Pure tiger nut flour, by using the raw dry tigernuts or toasted dry tigernuts. The toasting adds an extra toasty flavour profile to the flour. Toasting also dehydrates the nuts more making it easier to grind into a fine powder which is much darker than the flour from the untoasted nuts. It is entirely up to you to know which you prefer especially putting into consideration the recipes you will be using it for. You can buy Tigernut flour online from Jumia.com.

To make Pure Tigernut flour using raw tiger nut 

Dry Tigernuts

Remove any stones or grit from the tiger nuts.

Wash very well and drain into a sieve.

Using a kitchen napkin, pat the tiger nuts to remove as much water as possible. (This is an optional step, but I do it to give the drying process a head-on and avoid the risk of spoilage during very humid weather).

Spread out on a tray in a single layer, well separated, for good air circulation.

Leave to dry over a few days in the sun or a well-ventilated room.

Grind tiger nuts to a powder. (I prefer using the commercial mills because they do a better job and the strain might be too much for my dry mill grinder).

Pure Tigernut flour

Pure Tiger nut flour

Sift with a fine sieve to separate the chunkier grains.

Store in a bag or container and keep in the fridge until ready to use.

The fine powder can be used for general baking and for pancakes, fritters etc. while the coarser part can be used as a breading, for muesli, granola bars, topping on cereals, coating for energy balls etc.

To make Pure Tiger nut flour using toasted dry tigernut

Remove any stones or grit from the tiger nuts.

Wash very well and drain into a sieve.

Using a kitchen napkin, pat the tiger nuts to remove as much water as possible. (This is an optional step, but I do it to give the drying process a head-on).

Spread out on a tray in a single layer, well separated, for good air circulation.

Place in the oven at 150 deg. C for 30-60 minutes. Leave to cool completely.

Leave to cool completely.

Toasted tigernuts for Pure Tigernut flour

Toasted Tiger nuts

Grind tiger nuts to a powder. (I use the commercial mills, I have not attempted using my dry mill grinder).

Store in a bag or container and keep in the fridge until ready to use.

 

Note

  • You can buy Tigernut flour online from Jumia.com.
  • If your oven starts at a higher temperature say 180 deg. C, you can leave the oven door slightly open to avoid burning.
  • I sometimes toast mine for up to 1 hr, if I really want the flavour to be deeper.
  • The toasted tigernut flour does not require sifting as it comes out as a fine powder due to the extra drying.
  • I store mine in the fridge, I haven’t left it at room temperature for an extended period to know how long it will last.
  • If you sieve it before use, don’t discard the rough chaff, you can use it as breading or sprinkle on yoghurt, cereal etc. I used it to coat my Tigernut energy balls.

 

You can also make Pulp Tigernut flour from left-over pulp after Tigernut milk, also enjoy making my Tigernut milk, Tigernut energy balls and learn 25 amazing facts about Tigernut flour. Do you have any comments, questions or suggestions, please leave a comment below.

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  1. How to make Tigernut Pulp Flour - The Pretend Chef - […] (kunnu aya, horchata de chufas) and by grinding into powder the dehydrated whole tuber giving you Pure tigernut flour.…
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