The Pretend Chef

Miyan Kubewa, Miyan Busheshen Kubewa

Rich and flavourful miyan kubewa

Soups/ light soups | February 7, 2018 | By

Miyan Kubewa or more appropriately Miyan busheshen kubewa is the Northern Nigerian version of Okro soup. Made with dry okro it lacks the bright green colour of fresh okro soup rather, it looks more like an Indian curry and has a richer flavour.

I have had so many people tell me Miyan kubewa is heartwarmingly delicious so to get an authentic recipe, I met with a Hausa lady

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15 Easy Christmas Food Ideas

15 easy christmas food ideas

Christmas season, food, food and even more food. Delicious, seam bursting food!!! So…

  • Are you stumped for food ideas?
  • Are you bored with the same old menu?
  • Are you nervous about cooking for relatives and friends?
  • Do you want to make spectacular food on the cheap?
  • Do you want to impress and show off your culinary skills to you know who?
  • You just want good food on your table…

These are easy Christmas food ideas, dishes that you can incorporate into your Celebration menu for Christmas lunch/dinner or party, wedding parties, cocktails, end-of-year parties, house guest entertainments etc.

Wishing you and yours the best life has to offer, this Christmas season and into the New year—The Pretend Chef.

#letsgetcooking

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Ngwo ngwo goat offal pepper soup

How-tos, Meat, Soups/ light soups | December 18, 2017 | By

Ngwo ngwo goat offal pepper soup is a delicacy cooked in the Eastern part of Nigeria. The parts of the goat used are the tripe (stomach locally called towel), intestines, liver, kidney, heart, spleen, testicles and a bit of the flesh. Ngwo ngwo fills me with nostalgia because it always reminds of the cool and dusty harmattan days spent in the village during Christmas as kids.

We would always wake up very early on Christmas morning especially if we travelled to the village. Our alarm clock was the desperate

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12 Nigerian dishes everyone should know how to cook

okro soup 12 Nigerian dishes everyone should know how to cook

Nigeria is blessed with so much food, fresh organic produce with a lot of variety, due to its climate range. Nigerian climate changes from the north (Sokoto) to the south (Calabar), from Savannah to forest which is reflected in the vegetation and food found in each region. They are varied both in type and abundance. The variation also shows up in the way the ingredients are used in each region e.g in the south with an abundance of rainfall, vegetables are used fresh while in the far north with much less rain but an abundance of sunlight, dehydrated vegetables are mostly used which are stored and used all year round.

The sheer variety of dishes found in Nigeria is mind-boggling. Nigerians are also known to adapt imported cuisine to their taste and make it their own e.g

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Catfish pepper soup (Point and kill)

Best hot and spicy catfish pepper soup (Point and kill)

Recipes, Seafood, Soups/ light soups | September 14, 2017 | By

When the weather is cold, you are home warm and cosy, then your tummy starts rumbling, demanding food, what usually springs to mind? hot chocolate, steaming plate of spicy jollof rice, a large bowl of pepper soup, fresh fish pepper soup…? So I made this steaming hot pot of catfish pepper soup because it was raining and cold outside but warm and toasty indoors and we were hungry. I served it with white rice. My Rennaisance man, son no. 3 and I ate and were contented.

Catfish pepper soup is always high in demand by guests at Nigerian parties and is about the most common pepper soup cooked in Nigeria. It is served to a nursing mother during Omugwo (see Yam pepper soup (Ji mmiri oku). Catfish pepper soup is called point-and-kill in drinking parlours for a reason

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Afang soup deluxe

Afang Soup Deluxe

Afang Soup Deluxe is basically Afang soup taken from delicious to exquisite, this recipe will blow your Afang loving minds. A lot of experimentation goes on in the modern kitchen, the reason being that people are bolder now, taking risks in the kitchen. Be it the professional or home cook, everyone is prepared to go against the establishment and make a statement with their food, tell stories, put their personality or signature on the food they cook.

There is also a lot of fusion going on in food preparation. Afang Soup Deluxe is a fusion

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Gbegiri beans soup

Gbegiri, Creamy yoruba beans soup

I read somewhere that if the Yorubas of Western Nigeria were to have a flag, it will be the colours of Abula. Abula is a combination of Gbegiri, Ewedu and Obe Omi. I also heard that Gbegiri is an unhindered express road to a man’s heart, hmm…men will have to confirm that. It might just answer the age-old question, ‘what do men want?’ Gbegiri.

To be honest,

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Plain Okro Soup (Ila)

Fresh Plain okro soup with Omi Obe and Amala

Plain okro soup is different from the one pot okro soup, it is cooked to be accompanied by the versatile Omi Obe (stew). They make an exquisite pair. I first ate plain okro with Omi Obe in the boarding school. At first, it was a shock to me seeing stew and eba (garri fufu) served together, then there was this pool of seemingly uncooked okro right in the middle. Did somebody forget to stir the soup in the pot? Did they forget to add the okro when the soup was being cooked?  By the way who serves stew and eba? Coming from the Eastern part of Nigeria, I had only known the one pot Okro soup with green leafy vegetables. Eventually

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Ewedu Soup

Simple Ewedu soup

Ewedu soup is the soup my Yoruba friend, Shade loved and always raved about in secondary school. In the refectory, we were being served stew and Plain okro soup and the times I ate it I liked it, strange though. So I promised myself that one day I will get to eat Ewedu soup.

The opportunity presented itself at the early stage of Buka surfing in Lagos which my Sister-in-law and I indulge in, I remembered Shade and ordered Ewedu soup. After staring at it for awhile

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Omi Obe (Stew)

Omi Obe (Stew) with goat ear

To the Yorubas of Western Nigeria, Omi Obe is a ubiquitous stew/soup. Literarily translated as watery stew, it serves so many purposes and as a Nigerian home cook, it is one dish that should never be missing from your freezer. It will save you in many culinary emergencies, I speak from experience. For the flavour it packs, Omi Obe is surprisingly very simple to make with simple everyday ingredients.

Whenever I am in Lagos, my Sister-in-law and I go Buka surfing or revisit some of our favourite ones. No two buka stews taste exactly the same, but most are really, really good and the variety of meat can be overwhelming. In fact, some are so good you will be tempted to lick your plate. I also need to mention that my Rennaisance man

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